Formal education is worth it

Non-formal and informal education

Handbook Childhood and Youth Sociology pp 1-16 | Cite as

  • Sabine Maschke
  • Ludwig Stecher
Living reference work entry
First Online:
Part of the Springer NachschlageWissen book series (SRS)

Summary

In modern societies learning outside the curricular lessons at schools is getting more and more important in childhood and adolescence. Focusing this area of ​​informal and non-formal learning opportunities the article offers an analytical approach for research on these opportunities. Core idea is to differentiate between the perspective on the context - formal, non-formal, and informal - on the one hand and the perspective of the learner - intentional vs. incidental learning - on the other hand. Based on this differentiation our analytical approach results in six different fields (categories) of learning outside school which we illustrate by describing several research traditions falling into these different fields. At the end of the article we try to give some hints for further research deriving from our approach.

keywords

Non-formal and Informal Contexts of Learning Childhood Adolescence Intentional and Incidental Learning Extended Education
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Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1st professorship for educational science with a focus on general educational sciencePhilipps-Universität MarburgMarburgGermany
  2. 2nd professorship for educational science with a focus on general educational science, Justus Liebig University, Marburg, Germany