What is the best example of ammensalism

Basic question about symbiosis (or types of symbiosis)

I see there is some confusion about the meaning of symbiosis itself [regarding the comments and responses].

Your question / request for information about " some kind of symbiosis "that harms one organism without affecting the other in any way is very legitimate.

Amensalism (as answered by Sanjukta) is indeed the answer, but to say that "No. There does not seem to be an intimate association (symbiosis) that does not benefit any partner" , suggests that amensalism is not a symbiosis (which is not true).

Amensalism is just one of the types of symbiotic associations (symbiosis is nothing more than "coexistence" of two / more organisms - which may or may not benefit / harm one or both or neither of the parties involved in the association).

It should be noted that the symbiotic relationship is based on the members of two different species (i.e. two populations) relates, who are involved in an interaction, and that the interaction can be of any kind (amensalism is just another symbiotic association).

Edit: By studying the etymology of the word symbiosis, one should be able to decipher the meaning of symbiosis:

One can support the argument using the latest update of the Encyclopedia of Evolutionary Biology (Amensalism = Symbiosis) and cite the classic example of a walnut tree (which tends to kill or inhibit the growth of shrubs growing around its roots). Their growth is stunted, but their niche remains the same. More importantly, the honeybee-wasp relationship (long term) is best suited for symbiotic ammensalism.

So reciprocity, commensalism, amensalism are all symbiotic relationships.

References:

Miami College of Arts and Sciences, Department of Biotechnology Lecture Notes

Wiki link on biological interactions

Tyto alba

The books I am referring to do not contain amensalism as a symbiosis. Symbiosis is not a synonym for biological interaction. It's an association often referred to as the "intimate association" between two species (something that doesn't exist between amensals). Book .

JALO - JusAnotherLivngOrganism

Hi Sanjukta, I just added the etymology of symbiosis, hope this helps clear the doubt ...

Tyto alba

Yes it is. But amensals don't live together.

JALO - JusAnotherLivngOrganism

This reference comes from the latest update to the Encyclopedia of Evolutionary Biology (sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/B978012800049600189X) and the classic example of a walnut tree (which tends to kill or overgrow the growth of shrubs that grow around its roots inhibit) are quoted. Their growth is stunted, but their niche remains the same. More importantly, the honeybee-wasp relationship is best (long-term) for symbiotic ammensalism. But I very well acknowledge the point you are trying to make. I think it's a clash of two different schools of thought.